Human Rights and Freedom of Religion

The study of minority religions can also encourage students to consider questions of human rights and freedom of religion. Most people in a democratic society pay at least lip service to Article 18 of the United Nations Declaration of Human Rights [5] and Article 9 of the European Convention on Human Rights [6]. However, although legislation exists in the UK and elsewhere against discrimination on the grounds of religion, this has not eliminated either implicit or overt discrimination or prejudice against religions that are new and/or confined to a relatively small number of members. Religious literacy should involve concepts of citizenship and the challenges of living with unpopular minorities.

5. Everyone has the right to freedom of thought, conscience and religion; this right includes freedom to change his religion or belief, and freedom, either alone or in community with others and in public or private, to manifest his religion or belief in teaching, practice, worship and observance.

6. 1. Everyone has the right to freedom of thought, conscience and religion; this right includes freedom to change his religion or belief and freedom, either alone or in community with others and in public or private, to manifest his religion or belief, in worship, teaching, practice and observance.
2. Freedom to manifest one’s religion or beliefs shall be subject only to such limitations as are prescribed by law and are necessary in a democratic society in the interests of public safety, for the protection of public order, health or morals, or for the protection of the rights and freedoms of others.

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Beyond The Big 6

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